The Sonoma County Gazette: Community News Magazine
Sonoma County Gazette
Subscribe
| more

Photo Gallery

Oliver’s Market Releases Results of Updated Research

thumb_2_Olivers-600.jpg

Oliver’s Market Releases Results of Updated Research

Oliver’s Market is releasing the results of an updated report exploring the economic value of shopping locally. Both the latest report and the original 2011 report were conducted by Dr. Robert Eyler, business consultant and Professor of Economics at Sonoma State University.

The results of Going Local as a Retailer: Oliver’s Market 2016 include the following findings:

When a consumer buys a locally produced product from Oliver’s, the financial benefit to Sonoma County is 2 ½ times greater than when purchasing a national brand from a chain store.

When a consumer buys a locally produced product from Oliver’s, the local taxes generated by that sale is almost three times greater than purchasing a national brand from a chain store.

For every $1 Oliver’s spends on payroll, Oliver’s local focus supports another 81 cents in payroll spending at the Sonoma County producers supported by the company.

“We believe as a locally owned and operated business supporting other local businesses that we contribute a larger amount of dollars to our community, but having this measurement and assessment makes the benefits more tangible, both to us and our customers,” said Tom Scott, CEO, Oliver’s Markets. “Not only are Sonoma County products generally outstanding in quality, but when we all see the benefit to buying them and supporting them, the importance is hard to ignore. It is also gratifying to see how the ripple made by these choices has grown in impact since the original study.”

The report concludes:

“Going local makes a powerful, economic difference than buying from non-local firms on Sonoma County. Oliver’s current operations provide over $184.3 million, $19.3 million in state and local taxes, and create or sustain over

711.5 jobs for Sonoma County. If a non-local grocer hires and buys locally in the same capacity, Sonoma County loses over $6.5 million of the broader impacts because the profits go away from Sonoma County; if the non-local grocer also sources no goods locally, Sonoma County loses over $57.6 million annually.”

To read the full report, visit oliversmarket.com and click on the Local Report button.