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Commission on Human Rights Resolution Opposes Dakota Access Pipeline

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Commission on Human Rights Resolution Opposes Dakota Access Pipeline

Think global and act local. This is the intention behind the actions of the Commission on Human Rights, which passed a resolution in opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline. “We wanted to support the Standing Rock Sioux, but also the actions of our local tribal leadership from the Coyote Valley Band and Kashia Band of Pomo, Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria and Ya-Ka-Ama, as well as the many residents of Sonoma County who have mobilized around this issue,” says Vice Chair Dmitra Smith

“We also wanted to reinforce the 2006 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the 2011 United Nations Human Rights Council Resolution, noting the links between environmental and human rights. Environmental damage can have serious negative implications on the human rights of the most vulnerable groups. We felt that the risks of this project, combined with the historical human rights violations of Native Americans in this country, warranted an official statement on this issue. We all need clean water and the water protectors are holding the line for all of us with their peaceful demonstrations, against great challenges.”

The Commission joins nineteen U.S. city governments and more than 300 tribes who have rallied in support of the Standing Rock Sioux’s stance against the routing of the Dakota Access oil pipeline under the Missouri River near their reservation. After last night’s unanimous vote, the Commission is urging elected officials to consider adopting similar proclamations county wide. 

The Commission on Human Rights is an appointed advisory board to the County Board of Supervisors. The mission (role) of the Sonoma County Commission on Human Rights is to provide leadership, guidance, and assistance in insuring that all members of our community – especially those among us who are marginalized or disadvantaged – enjoy the full range of human rights to which every person is entitled. 

“We wanted to support the Standing Rock Sioux, but also the actions of our local tribal leadership from the Coyote Valley Band and Kashia Band of Pomo, Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria and Ya-Ka-Ama, as well as the many residents of Sonoma County who have mobilized around this issue,” says Vice Chair Dmitra Smith

“We also wanted to reinforce the 2006 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the 2011 United Nations Human Rights Council Resolution, noting the links between environmental and human rights. Environmental damage can have serious negative implications on the human rights of the most vulnerable groups. We felt that the risks of this project, combined with the historical human rights violations of Native Americans in this country, warranted an official statement on this issue. We all need clean water and the water protectors are holding the line for all of us with their peaceful demonstrations, against great challenges.”

The Commission joins nineteen U.S. city governments and more than 300 tribes who have rallied in support of the Standing Rock Sioux’s stance against the routing of the Dakota Access oil pipeline under the Missouri River near their reservation. After last night’s unanimous vote, the Commission is urging elected officials to consider adopting similar proclamations county wide. 

The Commission on Human Rights is an appointed advisory board to the County Board of Supervisors. The mission (role) of the Sonoma County Commission on Human Rights is to provide leadership, guidance, and assistance in insuring that all members of our community – especially those among us who are marginalized or disadvantaged – enjoy the full range of human rights to which every person is entitled.